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Dino Rossi update: a decision to run by year's end

The former Washington state senator, who lost to Chris Gregoire in the super-close 2004 gubernatorial election, grants an interview to a friendly.
In an interview with Liz Mair of GOPProgress.com, Dino Rossi, the Washington GOP gubernatorial candidate in 2004 who lost by a few votes to Democrat Chris Gregoire in that legally contested election, says he will decide by the end of the year whether to run for governor again in 2008.
We're just getting started up really, we've been at it less than a year now. We're going to be launching a few other things over the next couple of months, hiring a couple of people, and we're going to keep it moving ... Last year, I helped 36 candidates in three states, so I was very, very busy helping candidates I liked, free enterprise type candidates that I thought would be good, especially for the small and medium sized business community. Those are the people that I lent my help and support to. And now as to the second part of your question, we'll make a decision at the end of this year as to whether we do it again or not. With four children between six and sixteen, we've got to make sure it's right for the family first. There's a lot of variables there. And we have to assess whether the skills I have to offer are still necessary to turn the state around. We'll make that assessment as well. If I did do it again, and if I did win again, it looks like I'd be walking into what I walked into when we got the majority in 2003. It's a big mess that we'll have to straighten out again, but it's not like I haven't done that before. [laughs] I have experience doing that.
Rossi said by 2010, the Democrats could be where the Republicans were in 2006 and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray could be vulnerable. Rossi has been pretty much invisible to media since a Superior Court in 2005 rejected the Republican Party challenge of Gregoire's election. He has an exploratory committee, however – a "foundation" – studying just about everything a potential political campaign would want to study. Rossi says his 501(c)(4) organization, called Forward Washington Foundation, is "centered around improving the business climate in the state for small and medium sized businesses, and also fiscal responsibility in state budgeting," and "is good way to highlight these issues." On its Web site, the exploratory foundation is raising money to "help us play an active role in offering and promoting solutions on important state issues such as the business climate, responsible state budgeting, accountability in state government and protecting the poor and the vulnerable." It's also "administering employer surveys with the intent of learning more about the challenges facing businesses in Washington state."

Chuck Taylor is formerly editor of Crosscut. He has also worked for The Seattle Times and Seattle Weekly, and now blogs at Seattle Post-Times. You can reach him at chuck.taylor@newsdex.net.


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Comments:

Posted Mon, Apr 9, 3:15 p.m. Inappropriate

Rossi will fix all our problems: My goodness, I'm on pins and needles awaiting return of Republican control of the state government. As we've seen for the past several years in DC the republicans are in deed the party of small government, balanced budgets, fiscal responsibility, compassionate conservatism, and strong believers in the right to be left alone by the government. Also being a right wing religious person who desperately desires the apocalypse, but will settle for now, with control of the schools by the Discovery Institute, I hope that once again Rossi is successful with bamboozling the press in to not reporting his right wing extremist religious views. I am certain that Crosscut, with its stated mission, will not not be a problem in that regard.

Posted Mon, Apr 9, 5:24 p.m. Inappropriate

Rossi Will Be Good for Washington: I for one will be happy to see Sen. Dino Rossi return to once again take on Mrs. Gregoire. Dino, we look foward to it!

Misty

Posted Mon, Apr 9, 7:33 p.m. Inappropriate

Rossi Redux: Not having read the full GOP article, it was nice not to hear again about a "stolen" election and so called voter fraud. Mr. Rossi and his campaign couldn't convince a hand picked republican Judge, or, as recent news accounts show, a republican Attorney General of the validity of those charges. Maybe the GOP party can ask Mark Sidran if he would run.

upsman

Posted Mon, Apr 9, 11:24 p.m. Inappropriate

And?: Hey crosscutters. So, what exactly is the news here? That Rossi granted someone an interview? That might be interesting, except that he conveyed exactly 0 bits of information (we already knew that he may or may not run for governor again, just as certainly as we know that it may or may not rain tomorrow).

The fact that you're giving Rossi press for nothing suggests that either you support him, or it's just a slow news day.

So, do you think a Rossi candidacy a good thing?
Sean

Posted Tue, Apr 10, 9:09 a.m. Inappropriate

RE: And?: We don't really care who runs for governor. No, it's not big news, but for political junkies there is some information here. It's not going to whack you upside the head, but there's something to be gleaned about his campaign, his belief that he should have won the 2004 election, his general attitude going forward. If you look at what he says here and what his Web site says, you could come to the conclusion that he's running until further notice, not merely thinking about running.

Also, if this is so unnewsworthy, why did David Postman and Horse's Ass bother with it? Postman is neutral and Horse's Ass is decidedly anti-Rossi.

You're reading into this something that isn't there. It was a simple decision to disseminate information about somebody who's been under the radar but is essentially running for governor full time, today.

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