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Computer sciences: Not dominated by Dilberts, but still short on women

For women, particularly of color, the glass ceiling can be a problem, and so can simple underrepresentation. Modest gains have failed to erase the male domination.
Magda Balazinska, left, UW assistant professor in Computer Science and Engineering, talks with two students.

Magda Balazinska, left, UW assistant professor in Computer Science and Engineering, talks with two students. Courtesy of the University of Washington

Barbara Frewen, a research scientist at the University of Washington, studied there in computer science and other fields.

Barbara Frewen, a research scientist at the University of Washington, studied there in computer science and other fields. Courtesy of the University of Washington

Krista Davis, left, worked with a colleague while a student in computer science at the University of Washington. Davis is now at Google.

Krista Davis, left, worked with a colleague while a student in computer science at the University of Washington. Davis is now at Google. Courtesy of the University of Washington

This article originially appeared in the International Examiner. Reprinted with permission.

For women in the U.S., breaking the glass ceiling remains a daunting challenge, particularly in the fast-paced world of computer science. Paradoxically, while the U.S is still at the forefront of the international field of information technology, women continue to lag behind men in the workforce.

Experts agree that there continues to be a gender and ethnic imbalance in computer science. Despite modest gains in recent years, computer science remains, for the most part, a male-dominated industry.

"The most important thing is not to take the gains of recent years for granted and not to believe that the playing field is in fact level," said Ed Lazowska, the Bill and Melinda Gates chair in computer science at the University of Washington.

“There can be no doubt that computer science has a gender diversity problem,” he said. “It’s something we’ve been aware of for years now, and something we’ve been working on for years.”

The mere fact that women are underrepresented can cause them to under-perform at the workplace, said Sapna Cheryan, a UW assistant professor of psychology. “There is still a perception that Silicon Valley is the Valley of the Boys. Men are seen as more adept at engineering while women are not,” she added.

Cheryan’s research focuses on the power of negative stereotypes in the technology industries. “The prevailing stereotype is that computer scientists are geeks, who lack social skills, play video games, and prefer junk food,” she added.

Cheryan’s findings are borne out by a study by the National Center for Women and Information Technology, which attributed the underrepresentation of women to the continuing power of cultural stereotypes about women’s skills.

According to most experts, there remains a relatively small proportion of African-Americans, Hispanic, and Asian-American women in these fields. Yet still there are notable exceptions from the Puget Sound region. Many of the University of Washington’s graduates from underrepresented groups are leaders in the computer science field.

One is Karen Liu, a Chinese-American who earned a Ph.D. in computer science at the UW and is now on the faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Liu is a leader in the field in computer graphics and digital animation. She received a MIT Technology Review “TR 35 Award” several years ago, one of the 35 top technologists under the age of 35.

Another success story is Hakim Weatherspoon, an African-American Husky football player from rural Washington. “As I recall, his dad worked in the lumber industry, his mom was a school teacher, and his older brother now works for a start-up after spending a number of years at Intel,” Lazowska said.

A UW computer science graduate who subsequently earned a doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley, Weatherspoon is now on the faculty of computer science at Cornell University, like the UW and Berkeley, one of the top ten universities in the country in the field.

A number of other UW computer science graduates of color, many Asian-American women, work at such technology firms as Google, Amazon, Intel, and Boeing. Yet some, like Weijia Wang, a systems engineer at Intel, have noticed a high degree of turnover at their respective firms.

“I know of quite a few women employees, specifically Asian-American women, who have left Intel to pursue further education,” Wang said. “For the majority of the groups I have worked with here at Intel, I have almost always been the only female in the group. But I think Intel does a good job of promoting diversity.”

Overall, the number of computer science graduates at the University of Washington remains robust. “Despite widespread observance of a decrease in computer science degrees, there are about three times as many degrees awarded annually in computer science nationwide as in all the physical sciences taken together,” Lazowska said.

“There are two-thirds as many degrees granted in computer science as in all of the rest of engineering combined — electrical, chemical, industrial, civil, nuclear, biomedical, aeronautical, materials.”


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Comments:

Posted Sat, Aug 28, 10:32 p.m. Inappropriate

Michael Arrington has just written a piece on this in TechCrunch that's worth a read.

"Too Few Women In Tech? Stop Blaming The Men. Or At Least Stop Blaming Me."
http://techcrunch.com/2010/08/28/women-in-tech-stop-blaming-me/

It's a response to a Wall Street Journal blog post by Shira Ovide, also worth a read, entitled "Addressing The Lack Of Women Leading Tech Start-Ups."

http://blogs.wsj.com/venturecapital/2010/08/27/addressing-the-lack-of-women-leading-tech-start-ups/

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