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Coal Wars: Port opponents make big use of access to information

When Scoop Jackson wrote the Environmental Protection Act, no one could have imagined how the Internet would empower activists to dig into something like coal exports.
Rhe Kingston Ferry awaits as a BNSF locomotive interrupts ferry traffic at Edmonds’ busy road-train-ferry bottleneck, a concern cited by community members there.

Rhe Kingston Ferry awaits as a BNSF locomotive interrupts ferry traffic at Edmonds’ busy road-train-ferry bottleneck, a concern cited by community members there. Paul Anderson, Chuckanut Conservancy

Rick Marshall, a Portland developer, speaks against coal exports at the Dec. 12 meeting in Vancouver for southern Washington residents to discuss the scope of environmental review on coal ports.

Rick Marshall, a Portland developer, speaks against coal exports at the Dec. 12 meeting in Vancouver for southern Washington residents to discuss the scope of environmental review on coal ports. Bill Purcell

Supporters hoist anti-coal signs for a speaker at Friday Harbor.

Supporters hoist anti-coal signs for a speaker at Friday Harbor. Floyd McKay

Second article in a three-part series

Scoop Jackson didn’t have the Internet in mind when he wrote the Environmental Protection Act in 1969, but that marvelous invention has dramatically changed the way the Washington senator’s legacy has operated. The democratizing of information has given community activists a shot at the Big Guys, who always have had access to data.

Witness the activists' and community members' multi-faceted attacks on plans to export coal from Pacific Northwest ports, in thousands of comments to public agencies charged with the environmental review of Gateway Pacific Terminal (GPT), proposed at Cherry Point north of Bellingham.

Most of the 16,000 “uniquely worded” — not form letters — comments from GPT opponents are laced with footnotes and references that to studies and information in 1969 would have been available only to big companies and big environmental groups. Today, small groups and individuals can back their talk with citations from eminent experts. In the case of the coal ports, it could be a game-changer.

Terminal opponents must move the Environmental Impact Study (EIS) beyond the Gateway site in order to introduce impacts such as ship and rail traffic, global warming, and health threats. Terminal backers want a narrower review, as we discussed in Part I of this series.

With so many opposition groups and such a range of concerns terminal backers have been playing “whack-a-mole,” with new issues cropping up daily and threatening to bury their argument of more jobs and taxes to support local schools and governments. Opposition scoping comments range from tiny endangered herring at Cherry Point to ship traffic to Asia through Unimak Pass on the Bering Sea. Somehow, the agencies must draw a line.

Whatcom Docs, 212 physicians in Whatcom and Skagit counties, even urged an additional review, a Health Impact Assessment, quoting a federal study that “the Puget Sound region ranks in the country’s top 5% of risk for exposure to toxic air pollution, with risks including cancer, heart disease, lung damage, and nerve damage." “This is not a hypothetical case,” the physicians assert, “The data indicates that adding additional large sources of (trains’) diesel and particulate matter pollution in the Puget Sound region would exacerbate human health problems that are already documented to be present.“

The docs are talking trains, a popular target of GPT opponents that goes well beyond GPT’s boundaries.

Opponents do not believe BNSF Railway can increase coal traffic without serious impacts on local communities. “The addition of the massive increases of coal train traffic is likely to present significant adverse impacts on other users of the rail line, including grain and fruit shippers, intermodal users, ports, industries, aircraft manufacturers and passenger rail — all of whom are critically dependent on timely and affordable access to the rail system,” states Earthjustice, an environmental law firm speaking for several organizations. “There will be mitigation costs for structures such as overpasses, tunnels, and railroad crossings. The EIS must also address whether the public will be expected to bear any costs for infrastructure constructed for private benefits. Federal and State Governments commonly bear a significant share of the costs of freight rail capacity improvement projects.”

Federal regulations typically limit a railroad company’s contribution to these safety projects to 5 percent of the cost.

Similar concerns, but related to ocean shipping, are raised by Friends of the San Juans. Director Stephanie Buffum’s comment has the requisite scientific citations, but raises a broader issue for islanders: their reason for being islanders.” “Maintaining the health, integrity and natural beauty of these islands in the Sound is critical to preserving our local and regional economy. However, the GPT project may impact an array of topics that could threaten both the way of life for residents [and] tourists and the reasons both groups are here, the remarkable natural environment of this portion of the Salish Sea.”


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Comments:

Posted Wed, Mar 20, 3:20 p.m. Inappropriate

I am glad Citizens are speaking out against the China Coal Ports; but could this term "Salish Sea" go away? It is cloying, it makes me not want to listen to a word a person who uses it says.

jhande

Posted Wed, Mar 20, 4:13 p.m. Inappropriate

A very large number of very talented and dedicated volunteers contributed a lot of time and money to make the scoping comments for Cherry Point Coal Pile and Port a success. Scoop and the activists who pushed him to sponsor the bill deserve credit for their vision.

Posted Wed, Mar 20, 4:14 p.m. Inappropriate

A very large number of very talented and dedicated volunteers contributed a lot of time and money to make the scoping comments for Cherry Point Coal Pile and Port a success. Scoop and the activists who pushed him to sponsor the bill deserve credit for their vision.

Posted Tue, Apr 16, 4:56 a.m. Inappropriate

‘There is nothing a government hates more than to be well-informed; for it makes the process of arriving at decisions much more complicated and difficult.’ John Maynard Keynes

from Skidelsky R (1992) John Maynard Keynes: a biography. Vol. 2: The economist as saviour, 1920-1937 (London: Macmillan) p630.

geking49

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