Non-traditional: Seahawks' bosses actually get along

Column and video: Good management is a contrast with much of the franchise's past. Not to mention the comparison to the Seattle Mariners' dysfunction.

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The key in Seattle was that Carroll would not have accepted the job unless owner Paul Allen and then-president Tod Leiweke gave him final say over personnel matters. That always is a risk, but Carroll insisted that he be given the control he lacked during his one-year tenure with the New York Jets (1994) and three years with the New England Patriots (1997-99).

A part of that control included the right to pick what would appear to be his boss, the GM. But so far, the tandem appears a more horizontal pairing than a vertical one. Not to mention successful.

"I don’t know if I said this clearly in the past, but I thought that this relationship would be the one that could be the issue that pushes us over the top, if we did it right," Carroll said. "I think it’s like making a good marriage. It’s not any different. You have to work and bend and understand and learn and grow and be resilient.

"We have to do all of those things too.”

If the Seahawks don't make the Super Bowl, everything will be scrutinized to the nano level. But it seems as though the GM-coach relationship will not be among the usual suspects considered when a team falls short.

Too bad. There is such a rich tradition of Seahawks front office mayhem and discord — next month is the 18th anniversary of Behring's attempt to move the franchise to Los Angeles — that it's a shame we likely will be denied another bracing plunge into the chilly abyss of front-office dysfunction.

There's always the Mariners.

Art Thiel is co-founder of Sportspressnw.com, a former sports columnist for The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and author of the 2003 regional best seller about the Seattle Mariners, Out of Left Field.


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Comments:

Posted Thu, Jan 9, 9:20 a.m. Inappropriate

This is written so well it is unworthy of the average sports fan to appreciate.

giorgio

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