The Daily Troll: Ed Murray hears Rainier Beach worries. Archbishop to nuns: Let's be friends. Jail for initiative fraud.

The rain and wind make for some messes.
The Daily Troll: News for your evening commute.

The Daily Troll: News for your evening commute. Art work by Noel Franklin

Rainier Beach crime: To be fixed?

Rainier Beach residents delivered a clear message to Mayor Ed Murray and Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole during the mayor's third find-it, fix-it walk in Seattle neighborhoods. The message was simple: The city has to improve public safety in the south end community. KIRO reports that one resident, Neale Frothingham, told city officials, "People have the right not to be assaulted by burglars in their homes, or be pistol-whipped, beaten and robbed in the lobby of the Rainier Beach Library."  Murray promised to assign more officers to the south streets. And, he said, the city will hire more officers. But, um, haven't mayors been saying that for years?

Crosscut's Bill Lucia recently profiled some of the neighborhood's concerns and ideas for stemming violence — including more neighborhood-oriented policing and engaging young people in healthy activities — in a two-part series here and here

Nun control

The Vatican's campaign to crack down on American nuns is moving into a new phase, with Seattle Archbishop J. Peter Sartain playing The Man to Tell the Women What to Do. Joel Connelly of seattlepi.com reports that Sartain was his usual polite self today in his first address to the Leadership Conference of Religious Women since the Vatican ordered the organization to clear any major plans with him in advance. Sartain assured conference attendees at their annual meeting in Nashville that he was speaking to them as "a brother and a friend." A National Catholic Reporter story says Sartain "listened intently" to the nuns who spoke at the conference. But did he or the church hierarchy really hear what they have to say.

Do the voter fraud, do the time

Secretary of State Kim Wyman today said she is pleased by the jail sentence meeted out to the Marysville woman who submitted hundreds of phony signatures on referendum petitions seeking to overturn gay marriage. Julie Klein will serve six months for submitting the phony John Hancocks and then lying about it. According to The Herald, she'll be allowed out of jail during her working hours — she just started a new job. Klein also admitted to submitting falsified signatures on another measure: Initiative 1185. Wyman's office believes her sentence is the first of its kind.

Rain, wind and fires

Overnight rain broke a record at Sea-Tac Airport, sending water and oil flowing across Bellevue's Factoria Boulevard and, at least temporarily, helping firefighters in central Washington. In some areas east of the Cascades, the accompanying winds brought big problems: Huge clouds of blowing dust forced some 8,000 people from the Grant County Fair's opening day on Tuesday in Moses Lake. It also caused accidents and the temporary closure of I-90 east of Moses Lake, according to the Wenatchee World. Sea-Tac's 1.07 inches not only shattered the old daily rainfall record for Aug. 13. In fact, it dumped more rain that Seattle's normal average for the month of August (.88 inch), according to KING 5. And the storms ain't over yet: The National Weather Service is warning of possible lightning strikes — and new fires — through early morning in Central Washington.

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Joe Copeland is political editor for Crosscut. You can reach him at Joe.Copeland@crosscut.com.


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