Quantcast
Support Crosscut

Why Seattleites marched for science

Marchers head to Seattle Center on their way from Capitol Hill. Credit: Nick Turner

On a drizzly Saturday in Seattle, thousands of scientists, supporters and enthusiasts gathered at Cal Anderson Park and marched to the Seattle Center on the 47th Earth Day.

The March for Science was created as a reaction to President Donald Trump’s anti-science rhetoric, including his repeated denunciations of climate change as a hoax, and the proposed budget cuts to the federal Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

At a pre-march rally at Cal Anderson, various scientists and politicians, including Governor Jay Inslee and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, spoke about the significance of science to a crowd.

During the Emerald City’s march, we asked protesters one simple question: why are you marching for science today?

Here are some of the people and their responses:

Saritha (right) with her husband Sharath, with child (they didn't want to give family names): “We’re both in the sciences. I’m a trained microbiologist, he’s a computer science guy, and I think science is intellectual curiosity and it fuels our ability to think, and that’s the most critical thing.”
Saritha (right) with her husband, Sharath, with child (they didn’t want to give family names): “We’re both in the sciences. I’m a trained microbiologist, he’s a computer science guy, and I think science is intellectual curiosity and it fuels our ability to think, and that’s the most critical thing.” All photos by Nick Turner

 

Andre Perkins: “I’m marching because I’m a climate scientist and I’m worried about what might happen to us in the future. The risks involved are pretty high and doing nothing about it isn’t an option, so I’m marching today for climate science."
Andre Perkins: “I’m marching because I’m a climate scientist and I’m worried about what might happen to us in the future. The risks involved are pretty high and doing nothing about it isn’t an option, so I’m marching today for climate science.”

 

Christie, left, Lillian and Eric Jacobson. Christie: “For her. Well, I mean for everyone, but for her future.” Eric: “It’s been like pulling teeth to get our government to make policy based in science. We got maybe five years before we lock in 1.5C [degrees] of warming, and then after that, you know, we’re just cruising to 2C and her future is just getting dimmer and dimmer the longer we wait to start listening to the scientists.”
Christie, left, Lillian and Eric Jacobson. Christie: “For her. Well, I mean for everyone, but for her future.” Eric: “It’s been like pulling teeth to get our government to make policy based in science. We got maybe five years before we lock in 1.5C [degrees] of warming, and then after that, you know, we’re just cruising to 2C and her future is just getting dimmer and dimmer the longer we wait to start listening to the scientists.”
Heather McDonough: “I’m a second grade teacher and I love my students, and I’m here for a better future for them and a better world for them.”
Heather McDonough: “I’m a second grade teacher and I love my students, and I’m here for a better future for them and a better world for them.”

 

Jim Boon: “I’m marching because science is our hope. I’m afraid about the budget cuts that are being proposed and how it might affect our progress toward lifesaving research. I’m a physician and a scientist. I work on vaccine development, so we’re trying to figure out how to prevent respiratory viral infections in infants and also the elderly, and trying to develop new vaccines to prevent those infections.”
Jim Boon: “I’m marching because science is our hope. I’m afraid about the budget cuts that are being proposed and how it might affect our progress toward lifesaving research. I’m a physician and a scientist. I work on vaccine development, so we’re trying to figure out how to prevent respiratory viral infections in infants and also the elderly, and trying to develop new vaccines to prevent those infections.”

 

Jennifer Marroquin, right, and Taylor Hernandez, students in the UW Public Health program. Jennifer: “Just to show the importance of science and the impact that research has on the community.” Taylor: “Because it has a profound impact on public health and public health policy, and how people stay healthy for right now and for future generations.”
Jennifer Marroquin, right, and Taylor Hernandez, students in the UW Public Health program. Jennifer: “Just to show the importance of science and the impact that research has on the community.” Taylor: “Because it has a profound impact on public health and public health policy, and how people stay healthy for right now and for future generations.”

 

Michael Pamphlet, an engineer, with husband Tristen Gardner, right. Pamphlet: “Without science, we wouldn’t have computers. Without computers, we wouldn’t have the internet. Without the internet, we wouldn’t have the empowerment of knowledge that we have right now. My background is an engineer. I wouldn’t have my career without science. That’s why I march.”
Michael Pamphlet, an engineer, with husband Tristen Gardner, right. Pamphlet: “Without science, we wouldn’t have computers. Without computers, we wouldn’t have the internet. Without the internet, we wouldn’t have the empowerment of knowledge that we have right now. My background is an engineer. I wouldn’t have my career without science. That’s why I march.”

 

Emi Montinegro: “To raise awareness for the fact that science is a very patriarchal institution. And a lot of the progress – or so-called progress – that comes out of science comes at a really high cost, especially for marginalized communities and people of color and indigenous people.”
Emi Montenegro: “To raise awareness for the fact that science is a very patriarchal institution. And a lot of the progress – or so-called progress – that comes out of science comes at a really high cost, especially for marginalized communities and people of color and indigenous people.”

 

Gary Park: “I’m a physician and we need science to take care of patients. Simple. That’s it.”
Gary Park: “I’m a physician and we need science to take care of patients. Simple. That’s it.”

 

Read more about:

Support Crosscut