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Quiz: You vs. the candidates | Election Guide 2017


How do your stances compare to those of the mayoral candidates’?

Crosscut sent out a questionnaire containing sixteen questions to each candidate. We asked questions based on four important issues that Seattle faces: homelessness, affordable housing, police reform and taxes. See how you compare to each candidate by filling out the same questionnaire below.

Q1. Do you support civilian investigations into police conduct?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Yes

As U.S. Attorney, I crafted the consent decree that led to reforms in the Seattle Police Department, which is strengthening our civilian-led accountability system with ongoing community oversight, transparency, and embedded processes for continual improvement, and I agree with the move to include civilian investigators in the Office of Police Accountability.

Cary Moon

Yes

Yes, we need adequate citizen oversight of police, deeper anti-bias training, more integrated community policing and a focus on restorative justice and alternatives to incarceration.

Q2. Do you support working towards giving the Community Police Commission the power to hire or fire a police chief?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

While I support community oversight and the expanded role of the [Community Police Commission] in holding the police department accountable, the ultimate authority, responsibility, and accountability for the hiring and firing of a police chief — as with any department head in the city – should rest with the Mayor.

Cary Moon

No

The responsibility and authority to hire or fire a police chief is the mayor’s, but as mayor I would actively consult with and involve the Community Police Commission.

Q3. Do you support opening union negotiations for police contracts to the public?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

There should be more transparency, and there are ways to incorporate public interest into negotiations but completely opening union negotiation to the public will undermine working people’s power and could open the door to right-to-work efforts by groups like the Evergreen Freedom Foundation.

Cary Moon

No

The mayor must be accountable and responsible for the management of our police force and as mayor I will assertively and transparently represent the interests of the public in contract negotiations without undermining the rights of public sector union members to collectively bargain.

Q4. Does the City have enough authority to ensure citizens’ privacy/safety in regards to body cams?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Maybe

We must continue examining whether the deployment of body-worn cameras strikes the balance between police accountability and law enforcement aims with a critical need to protect victims, minors, vulnerable communities, informants, and others with reasonable expectations of privacy.

Cary Moon

No

The State Public Disclosure Act prevents the city from fully protecting the identities of victims or innocent bystanders.

Q5. Should we wait for the state to act first on privacy rules for body cams before fully implementing them here?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

Recognizing the need to constantly examine whether the implementation is working adequately to address privacy concerns, we need to continue to fully deploy this critical tool for accountability.

Cary Moon

Maybe

I agree with the Seattle City Council’s pursuit of greater transparency by equipping police officers with body cams, however, we must also be careful to protect the privacy of victims, young people, and undocumented residents via collaboration with the state to ensure we have the infrastructure to address unintended privacy consequences.

Q6. Do you support an ordinance guaranteeing a right to shelter?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

I disagree with my opponent who has said she supports an ordinance guaranteeing a right to shelter — while I believe housing is a human right, an ordinance would divert millions of dollars in scarce resources to warehousing people experiencing homelessness in sometimes degrading shelters rather than providing people the housing they need to permanently exit homelessness.

Cary Moon

Maybe

As I said weeks ago, we should consider housing as a fundamental human right, like access to food and water, and our city should be doing everything possible to shelter homeless folks.

Q7. Do you support Mike O’Brien’s legislation to make it a low priority for police to remove RVs where people are living?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

I absolutely and unequivocally reject policies that criminalize homelessness, but a better approach to moving people experiencing homelessness into more stable housing would be expanding and improving interventions for people living in cars and RVs, which I’ve proposed a detailed plan to address.

Cary Moon

Yes

People living in vehicles account for more than 40% of the homeless population in Seattle, and I am encouraged by Councilmember O’Brien’s leadership to find the best ways to connect vehicle residents with the services and outreach they need while also ensuring that Seattle’s traffic and public safety laws are being followed.

Q8. Do you support evictions of unsanctioned homeless encampments?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Maybe

With living conditions often unhealthy and unsafe, unsanctioned encampments are not a humane solution for people experiencing homelessness, which is why the City needs to connect people who are currently living in encampments with services, and provide them with long-term solutions whether that is mental health treatment, treatment for substance abuse or chemical dependency, or access to low-barrier shelters as they transition into long-term stable housing; and before moving anyone, we need to do significant outreach to connect people with services, offer people an alternative place for shelter, and ensure that they are able to maintain their possessions.

Cary Moon

No

Unlike my opponent, I oppose the sweeps of homeless encampments and I would stop the
sweeps immediately if I were elected mayor while expanding low-barrier shelters and tiny house
villages to give homeless folks a way to come inside.

Q9. Are Seattle’s single-family zones an impediment to more affordable housing?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

While our growth requires that every part of the city increase in density, a one-size-fits-all approach will not be successful in how we handle growth in each of our diverse neighborhoods – there are a number of ways to add more density in single-family neighborhoods including more townhomes, mother-in-laws, and ADUs/DADUs.

Cary Moon

Yes

I believe altering our zoning code to legalize duplexes, backyard cottages, rowhouses, and congregate housing in single family residential neighborhoods is an important part of building enough housing for all the folks moving here while working with the community to decide where and how.

Q10. Do you support lobbying Olympia to lift the ban on rent stabilization?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Yes

Rent stabilization is one tool, and I’ve proposed a rent voucher program to provide immediate support to keep families and individuals in their homes, which would not need approval by Olympia.

Cary Moon

Yes

As mayor I would work with our delegation in Olympia to lift the ban on rent stabilization and
adapt best practices from other cities, as this could be an effective method to keep rents
affordable.

Q11. Would you restart the HALA process if elected mayor?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

No

My opponent said she would throw out the current agreement that requires developers pay for and build 20,000 units of affordable housing unit; we can’t afford to start over, and I will make sure developers keep their commitment to helping solve Seattle’s affordable housing crisis.

Cary Moon

No

Let me take a moment to be clear: I do not want to restart the HALA process — I think HALA was a good first step, and I support the upzones and MHA requirements, but there is more that we can do to improve housing affordability in Seattle, and must work carefully with neighborhoods trying to survive displacement and gentrification.

Q12. Do you support borrowing against the City’s credit in order to build more affordable housing?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Yes

I would support borrowing against the City’s credit in order to build more affordable housing as long as we have an identified revenue stream to pay for it.

Cary Moon

Yes

We have an affordable housing crisis in our city and we should be looking at all the tools and options available to us to fund the construction of more affordable housing as quickly as possible.

Q13. Do you support a higher Business & Occupation tax on larger businesses?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Maybe

I believe that growth should pay for growth, but we have to ensure that we’re not hurting our small businesses; this is why I’ve proposed a Small Business Agenda to eliminate B&O taxes for startups during their first three years.

Cary Moon

Yes

I support making our B&O tax more progressive by making larger corporations pay their fair share and reducing the B&O tax burden on small local businesses.

Q14. As mayor, will you propose more property tax levies despite their regressive nature?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Maybe

I will explore ways to go to Olympia and reduce the property tax burden for older homeowners, lower income owners, and landlords providing affordable housing, but in addition to next year’s Families & Education Levy, I would explore and possibly ask voters to support a measure to expand addiction and behavioral health services.

Cary Moon

No

Our city and state’s reliance on regressive taxes like property taxes and sales taxes are putting the financial burden disproportionally on working families and seniors, and I would push for Seattle to look at and adopt other more progressive sources of revenue.

Q15. Do you support impact fees on developers?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Yes

We need to do better to make growth pay for growth, but unfortunately, impact fees aren’t currently allowed for affordable housing.

Cary Moon

Yes

I support the appropriate use of impact fees and would work to find the right level of fee and best targeted investments for generated revenue, recognizing it is important to strike the right balance so the fee doesn’t exacerbate the escalation of housing prices and the proceeds are focused on highest returns to the neighborhood.

Q16. Is the City too dependent on real estate tax?

YesNoMaybe

Jenny Durkan

Maybe

All current taxes, like REET, dip in economic downturn and hurt the city’s ability to budget, so to create more affordable housing, I would leverage my strong relationships in Olympia to authorize an additional .25% to the existing Real Estate Excise Tax.

Cary Moon

Maybe

If you mean property tax: Yes, we need more progressive sources of revenue and I would work with our state delegation and our local advocacy groups to identify the best sources to balance the tax code.

If you mean REET: No, we are not too dependent — we should consider expanding REET by securing the authority to charge an additional .25% local option REET, perhaps on properties above a threshold like median sales price.

See your results

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Results

Of the questions you answered:

of your answers matched Jenny Durkan’s

of your answers matched Cary Moon’s

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