Slideshow

The Pasayten: wilderness with an edge

Neither pristine nor trashed, the 530,000-acre Pasayten Wilderness in north-central Washington is one of the most beautiful places in North America.

The now-abandoned Pasayten Airfield, built in 1931, once served as a base for fire suppression activities and trail building.

Source: Craig Parsley

A charming log Ranger Station next to the Pasayten Airfield was built by the Works Progress Administration.

Source: Craig Parsley

A view from the Pasayten toward Canada and points northeast

Source: Jerry Graham

A glacier-carved valley in the Pasayten Wilderness

Source: Craig Parsley

An old mining or trapping cabin in the Pasayten Wilderness

Source: Craig Parsley

A clearcut in the Pasayten now marks the border between the U.S. and Canada.

Source: Craig Parsley

A mountain man and poet, Parson Smith carved his initials in a tree in the Pasayten in 1886, unofficially marking the U.S.-Canadian border.

Source: Craig Parsley

A stump is all that remains of the 'Parson Smith Tree' that once marked the Canadian border in the Pasayten Wilderness.

Source: Craig Parsley

An obelisk marking the U.S.-Canadian border in the Pasayten

Source: Craig Parsley

Trees scarred by the Tatoosh Butte Fire in the Pasayten Wilderness.

Source: Craig Parsley

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