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Hidden Barriers: How the demographics of clinical trials can hurt people of color

How the demographics of clinical trials can hurt people of color

Medical research in the U.S. has a dark history, particularly when it comes to the Black community. This has led many in communities of color to distrust the institution of medicine. Across the nation, 60% of Americans as a whole said they will get a COVID-19 vaccine. But, among Black people, that number drops to 42%, compared with 83% of Asians, 63% of Latinx, and 61% of white adults, according to the Pew Research Center. Crosscut investigates what that means for research and treatment, and why representation matters when it comes to clinical studies.

America After 9/11

A discussion of the legacy of 9/11: why the terrorist attacks pulled the United States apart instead of bringing the country together, if the War on Terror is over or just taking a different shape and what we’re fighting for post-9/11 and why we haven’t yet won.

Bigger than a coffee shop, Part 2

Mikayla Weary has been community organizing since the sixth grade. Now a 17-year-old Mikayla Weary is the president of Black Coffee NW. Darnesha Weary, owner of the shop,  intentionally gave her daughter a title of power so she can walk into a space and be a stakeholder of Black Coffee. Mikayla Weary says working in the position has opened her eyes to how power structures play out in the corporate workspace. “I've learned in America titles mean everything and Black people usually don't get the big titles, but they do the work,” Mikayla Weary said. They hope by hiring more youth they can provide more opportunities to diversify the coffee industry.

Your Last Meal

Rachel Belle, host of the Your Last Meal podcast, digs into the history, science and culture of dishes with culinary anthropologists, fishmongers, cooks, astronauts — anyone who can help uncover the mysteries behind the foods we eat every day.