Capitol building in Olympia

Washington Legislature Elections

This guide won't tell you who to vote for, but should help you make the choice for yourself. 

We're a nonprofit so we don't make political endorsements of any kind. What we do is publicly driven journalism. To create this guide, we developed a multiple-choice survey to determine where candidates fall on a spectrum of issues. Those answers, and candidate bios, make up the meat of this guide. The potatoes are tips and links that will help you do things like register to vote and turn in your ballot, as well as learn about Washington's unique systems. Read more on our methodology below.

If you're still unsure — or want to dig deeper — we've got in-depth stories on many of these candidates and races.

What's at stake?

Washington voters are about to choose their next representatives in Olympia. All 98 Washington House seats are up for election, as well as 25 of 49 Senate seats. We don't have the capacity to cover all those races, but let us know if there are Legislative districts you'd like to see here in the future.

What legislative district do you live in?

Washington's 49 districts were redrawn this year (in a messy and quite dramatic fashion).

State House of Representatives, District 10 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 10 includes part of Island County, Skagit County and Snohomish County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Greg Gilday

Incumbent Greg Gilday was elected to the 10th Legislative District House seat two years ago. The Republican, attorney and small business owner runs a title and escrow company. He supported increasing incentives for building denser housing and accessory dwellings, but has spoken out against eviction reform proposals, saying they are making it hard for small landlords. He voted no on the capital gains tax that passed the state Legislature in 2021, calling it “unconstitutional, unpopular and unnecessary.” Gilday has been endorsed by local Republican, real estate and business groups. He has over $302,000 in campaign funds.

Clyde Shavers

First-time candidate Clyde Shavers is a former U.S. Marine, where he was stationed in the Middle East and Southeast Asia. The Democrat has worked as a lawyer at the Natural Resources Defense Council. Shavers says the 10th Legislative District needs a representative to fight for affordable housing, quality health care and education, and who will protect a woman’s freedom to choose and the environment. He has racked up endorsements from the Washington State Labor Council, Alliance for Gun Responsibility and Pro-Choice Washington, along with long list of building and trade unions, as well as Democratic groups. The veteran has about $370,000 in the bank for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 10 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 10 includes part of Island County, Skagit County and Snohomish County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Karen Lesetmoe

The Republican challenger in the 10th Legislative District is Karen Lesetmoe, who joined the Navy after 9/11, according to her campaign site. She lists supporting law enforcement, limiting government overreach and providing tax relief for middle-class and working-class families as her priorities. During this past decade, she has worked as a real estate agent. She says her family’s story — immigrants from the Philippines who built a new life from nothing other than dreams and hard work — is proof of the American dream. If elected, she said she would “reverse anti-police laws that caused a spike in crime” and “oppose onerous taxes.” The first-time candidate and veteran raised more than $200,000 for the race.

Dave Paul

Dave Paul, the Democratic incumbent in the 10th Legislative District’s Position 2 House seat first took office in 2019. He’s director of external relations at Skagit Valley College. Before that, Paul was a lecturer at Central Washington University. He sponsored and supported bills to decrease the cost of the Running Start pre-college program, lower the cost of prescription drugs and remove abandoned boats from waterways. His endorsements include the Washington State Labor Council, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility and Pro-Choice Washington, along with health care, education, building and trade unions, and Democratic groups. The second-term state representative has raised more than $365,000 for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 11 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 11 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

David Hackney

Incumbent David Hackney is a former assistant U.S. attorney with the Department of Justice and a war-crimes prosecutor for the United Nations. He’s running for his second term in one of the most diverse districts in the state. The Democrat supports a tax on capital gains. Hackney has sponsored bills that tighten firearm regulations and aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Hackney, who received a law degree from Harvard University, currently serves on the board of the Tukwila Children’s Foundation. He has about $97,000 for the race.

Stephanie Peters

Challenging incumbent David Hackney is Republican Stephanie Peters. With about a month left before the primary, Peters’ campaign site listed in her candidate statement was not loading. According to her statement for the state voter guide, she has worked more than three decades in resource and financial management, auditing and implementing efficiency measures. She repeats a common refrain attacking the integrity of the 2020 election, saying Washington voters “have a right to assurance of election security and integrity,” but currently “cannot verify that our voter rolls are clean” or “that our tabulation process has integrity,” among other claims. Peters has raised less than $1,000 for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 11 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats, but candidates for both are included here. District 11 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Steve Bergquist

Incumbent Steve Bergquist, a history and social studies teacher at Lindbergh High School in the Renton School District, first took office in 2013. The Democrat is vice chair of the Appropriations Committee. Bills of his that have passed include a measure allowing 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote and one simplifying the path for a paraeducator to become a fully certified teacher. Bergquist has also supported bills that aim to decarbonize the transportation sector, as well as residential and commercial buildings. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Bergquist helped start South King County Food Fighters, partnering with local groups to deliver meals each week to local families in need. He has raised about $222,000 for the race.

Jeanette Burrage

Republican challenger Jeanette Burrage has already served one term in the state House, from 1981 to 1982, representing the 31st Legislative District, which spans parts of south King County and north Pierce County. She’s also a former King County Superior Court judge and Des Moines City Council member. In 2016, she was found not guilty of assault for slapping a 6-year-old special-needs child while she worked as a school-bus driver. The Republican wants to expand the charter school program, saying these kinds of schools have better results and require less funding than traditional public schools. Burrage has a law degree from the University of Washington. She has raised about $7,300 for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 23 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 23 includes part of Kitsap County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Janell Hulst

Republican Janell Hulst is a real estate broker and licensed general contract running for state representative in Legislative District 23, Position 1. She has no previous elected experience but is an active community volunteer. Hulst says her main concerns are crime, inflation, ferries, homelessness and rising state government spending. She wants to cut taxes and help families and small businesses. She is in favor of educational choice and wants to “empower police to enforce laws.” As a lawmaker, Hulst says she would protect the most cherished freedoms in the Constitution, which she considers faith, family and private property. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she has raised about $24,000 for her campaign.

Tarra Simmons

The incumbent state representative in Legislative District 23, Position 1, is Democrat Tarra Simmons. She is vice chair of the Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee and serves on Healthcare, Public Safety and Rules committees. She is also the founding director and attorney for the Civil Survival Project and has also worked as a registered nurse and for Child Protective Services.. Simmons describes herself as a lawyer, a civil rights activist, and a national leader in the fight for criminal justice reform. She grew up in Bremerton and had a difficult youth, which included dropping out of school, becoming pregnant at age 14. Although she turned things around and graduated from college with a nursing degree, Simmons served time in prison as a young adult and then went back to school to get a law degree and has served in the Legislature since 2020, where she has passed legislation to increase voting rights, invest in behavioral health, reduce healthcare costs and improve community safety. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she has raised nearly $200,000 for her first re-election campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 23 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 23 includes part of Kitsap County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Drew Hansen

Drew Hansen has represented Legislative District 23, Position 2 in the state House of Representatives since 2011. Hansen is chair of the Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee, is also a trial lawyer and has taught civil rights at the University of Washington Law School. Last year, he passed legislation expanding public broadband to give people more affordable internet access. He has also worked with state universities to bring new college opportunities to Kitsap County and helped expand the Olympic College engineering program to train more engineers for shipyards. He also sponsored a bill for a new business tax to support higher education and school scholarships. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, he raised about $170,000 for this race, but had another $315,000 in the bank when the race started.

Paige A. Jarquin

A businesswoman without previous elected experience, Paige A Jarquin is the Republican challenging long-time lawmaker Drew Hansen for Legislative District 23, Position 2. She is a realtor and a business manager in the manufacturing industry and volunteers frequently for animal-welfare and military family support causes. Jarquin wants to focus in the Legislature on crime, the rising cost-of-living and personal liberties. She wants parents to have more control over what their children are taught in the classroom. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she has raised about $36,000 for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 25 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 25 includes Puyallup, Fife, South Hill, Midland and part of Parkland. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Cameron Severns

A write-in candidate for the 25th Legislative District, Position 2, Democrat Cameron Severns is an insurance and financial advisor and has worked in real estate. He has not served in an elected office. He volunteers at his church and leads an addiction-recovery ministry and teaches religious school. Severns also volunteers with a nonprofit rescuing sex-trafficking victims. He says he is focused on both public safety and economic opportunity. He wants to pass renter and homeowner protection legislation. His campaign fundraising reports are not yet available on the Public Disclosure Commission site.

Jamie Smith

Democrat Jamie Smith is running for state representative for the 25th Legislative District, Position 1. Her only previous elected position has been as an executive board member of the Puyallup Education Association. She has taught history for 18 years at Rogers and Puyallup high schools. She is a cross country and track coach and a regional curriculum trainer. Her legislative focus would be on fully funding public education, affordable and accessible healthcare for all Washingtonians, green jobs, a less regressive tax system, and improvements to state infrastructure. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she has raised about $10,000 for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 25 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 25 includes Puyallup, Fife, South Hill, Midland and part of Parkland. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Drew Hansen

Drew Hansen has represented Legislative District 23, Position 2 in the state House of Representatives since 2011. Hansen is chair of the Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee, is also a trial lawyer and has taught civil rights at the University of Washington Law School. Last year, he passed legislation expanding public broadband to give people more affordable internet access. He has also worked with state universities to bring new college opportunities to Kitsap County and helped expand the Olympic College engineering program to train more engineers for shipyards. He also sponsored a bill for a new business tax to support higher education and school scholarships. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, he raised about $170,000 for this race, but had another $315,000 in the bank when the race started.

Paige A. Jarquin

A businesswoman without previous elected experience, Paige A. Jarquin is the Republican challenging long-time lawmaker Drew Hansen for Legislative District 23, Position 2. She is a realtor and a business manager in the manufacturing industry and volunteers frequently for animal-welfare and military family support causes. Jarquin wants to focus in the Legislature on crime, the rising cost-of-living and personal liberties. She wants parents to have more control over what their children are taught in the classroom. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she has raised about $36,000 for her campaign.

State Senate, District 26

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 26 includes part of Kitsap and Pierce County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Emily Randall

Keeping the 26th Legislative District Senate seat in Democratic hands may be the party’s biggest challenge this election cycleEmily Randall first won the seat in 2018 by a margin of fewer than 100 votes, riding a blue wave into office. Last session, Randall helped pass a bill requiring employers to post salary information on job listings. She also pushed legislation to lower tolls on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. The community organizer and health care advocate has proposed bills to move the state toward universal health care. Endorsements include Washington State Labor Council, NARAL Pro-Choice Washington and local union and Democratic groups. The first-term senator has raised more than $790,000 for the race.

Jesse L. Young

A current 26th Legislative District representative, Jesse L. Young hopes to unseat Emily Randall from her Senate seat. The Republican was appointed to the House seat in 2014. He is a software engineer and IT consultant. He has racked up several ethics violations during his time in the statehouse for mixing campaign work with state staffing and resources. Last session, he spoke at demonstrations at the Capitol against COVID-19 public health restrictions and introduced bills to limit the governor’s emergency powers and ban abortions in the state at 15 weeks. He also supported decreasing the cost of tolls on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Young doesn't list any endorsements on his campaign website, but says he is backed by a police union, according to his candidate statement. He has raised more than $675,000 for the campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 26 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 26 includes part of Kitsap and Pierce County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Spencer Hutchins

Republican Spencer Hutchins, who previously served on the Gig Harbor City Council from 2017 to 2019, is running for state representative position 1 for the 26th Legislative District in an open seat. The lifelong Kitsap Peninsula resident is also a real estate broker. His volunteer work includes co-chairing the capital campaign for a local food bank and previous service on the Gig Harbor Planning Commission. 

Hutchins wants to cut crime, inflation and the skyrocketing cost of living, as well as stopping the upward trend in state taxes. He would prioritize giving law enforcement the tools they need to do their jobs.  According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Richards has raised more than $286,000 and there has been a significant amount of independent expenditures in this race.

Adison Richards

Democrat Adison Richards, a lawyer with the Northwest Justice Project, serving low-income families and victims of domestic violence, is running for state representative position 1 for the 26th Legislative District in an open seat. He does not have elected experience but has done a lot of public service law and community volunteering. Richards wants to work in the Legislature to help make housing, healthcare and childcare more affordable. He wants to lower taxes for working families, seniors and small businesses. And says he would prioritize public safety and homelessness, and ensure funding for first responders and police is adequate, so they can do their jobs. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Richards has raised more than $314,000 and there has been a significant amount of independent expenditures in this race.

State House of Representatives, District 26 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 26 includes part of Kitsap and Pierce County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Michelle Caldier

Incumbent state Rep. for the 26th Legislative District, Position 2, Michelle Caldier has taught at the University of Washington for more than a decade. She says she is known for bipartisanship, victim rights advocacy and reforming foster care. Prior to serving in the Legislature, Caldier was a dentist who cared for people in nursing homes. She would oppose what she calls unnecessary tax increases, and supports frontline works as well as protecting the most vulnerable, including foster children, sexual assault survivors and seniors. The fourth-generation Kitsap County resident has been involved in politics as a concerned citizen advocating on behalf of seniors.

According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Caldier has raised more than $223,000 for the race.

Matt Macklin

First-time candidate Matt Macklin is a Democrat running for the 26th Legislative District, Position 2. He is an attorney specializing in business, healthcare and compliance and also works as a licensed nursing home administrator. As an attorney, he also works in disability rights and legal advocacy for children who no longer have parents. In the Legislature, Macklin wants to work toward equitable access to healthcare, improving roads, bridges and ferries, and making more jobs and job training available in the trades and education. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Macklin has raised more than $60,000 for the race and there has been significant independent expenditures as well.

State Senate, District 30

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 30 is mostly in King County with a small section in Pierce County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Linda Kochmar

The Republican challenger for the Senate seat in the 30th Legislative District in the Federal Way area of South King County has previously served in the state House, on the Federal Way City Council and was Federal Way mayor in 2010. Linda Kochmar represented the district in the House from 2013 to 2016. In addition to extensive volunteer work, Kochmar has worked in various government related jobs during her career. She says her top priorities include public safety, economic prosperity and individual liberty. She is endorsed by a number of state lawmakers and local officials. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Kochmar has raised more than $210,000 for her campaign.

Claire Wilson

The current State Senator for this 30th Legislative District in the Federal Way area of South King County has focused on education during her four years in office. Prior to her election to the Legislature, Claire Wilson worked for 25 years for the Puget Sound Educational Service District, specializing in early education and family involvement. She also served on the Federal Way School Board from 2011 through 2019. The Democrat says her No. 1 priorities in the Legislature include expanding economic opportunities and building safe, supportive communities. She has a varied mix of endorsements, from local firefighters and teachers to Planned Parenthood and the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Wilson has more than $244,000 in the bank for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 30 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 32 includes part of King County with a small section in Pierce County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Casey Jones

This Republican challenger to represent Legislative District 30, Position 1, is a police commander and says he is “not a career politician.” Casey Jones is endorsed by various law enforcement groups and is focusing his campaign on public safety issues. He has worked at a variety of law enforcement jobs, from SWAT member to school resource officer. Jones maintains in his state voter guide statement that “radical groups have taken over policy development in Olympia.” He believes recent laws are preventing officers from arresting criminals who need to be arrested. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Jones has raised about $76,000 for his campaign.

Jamila E. Taylor

The current representative for Legislative District 30, Position 1, Jamila E. Taylor, was the prime sponsor of six bills that were signed into law during her first term in office. She is chair of the Legislative Black Caucus and works as an attorney for the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion or LEAD program that works with police to find alternatives to the criminal justice system for some people accused of committing a crime. The Democrat previously managed legal aid attorneys assisting domestic violence survivors and other crime victims and also worked as a youth advocate. She focuses in the Legislature on Iaw and justice work as well as community safety and health. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Taylor has raised more than $284,000 for this campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 30 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 32 includes part of King County with a small section in Pierce County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Kristine Reeves

A former state lawmaker, Kristine Reeves is a small business owner in Federal Way, serves on the Washington State Gambling Commision and has worked as the state’s economic development director for military families and veterans at the Washington State Department of Commerce. The Democrat has also worked for U.S. Sen. Patty Murray in the area of veterans affairs. Reeves advocates for a move away from partisan politics and toward “a renewed commitment to solving people’s problems.” While in the Legislature from 2017-2019, she worked on policy issues including family leave, affordable childcare, apprenticeship and job training for those not going to college and fought for lower taxes. According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Reeves has raised about $212,000 for this election.

Ashli Tagoai

The Republican running for this seat, Ashli Tagoai, is a first-time candidate for elected office. She is an attorney, who specializes in civil litigation, estate planning, real estate law and business law. Tagoai is a legal volunteer with Seattle University’s Domestic Violence Pop-Up Clinic and has helped survivors file for protection orders. In Olympia, she wants to fight regressive taxes that hurt middle class and lower income families. She will support police and first responders and says “Soft-on-crime policies are failing our district.” According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Tagoai has raised about $130,000 for this election.

State Senate, District 32

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 32 includes part of King County and Snohomish County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here

Jesse Salomon

In addition to being the incumbent Senator in the 32nd Legislative District, Jesse Salomon is a part-time public defender with King County. Before his election to the state Legislature in 2018, Salomon, a Democrat, served on the Shoreline City Council. Last year, he proposed a bill eliminating the ability of arbitrators to overturn disciplinary measures imposed on police officers, a measure backed by the American Civil Liberties Union. Read Crosscut’s story here. He has been endorsed by the Sierra Club, Alliance for Gun Responsibility and more than a dozen local unions and officials. Salomon has raised more than $165,000 for the race.

Patricia Weber

Democrat Dr. Patricia Weber is challenging first-term Sen. Jesse Salomon for the 32nd Legislative District Senate seat. For more than three decades, Weber worked at Fircrest Residential Habilitation Center, a state facility for those with intellectual and other disabilities, according to her candidate statement. Weber, a pediatrician, calls health care a human right and supports a state health care system. She has racked up endorsements from the 32nd Legislative District Democrats, King County Democrats and the Salish Sea chapter of the Federation of Democratic Women. Weber wants to see the wealthiest individuals and businesses pay their fair share, while reducing the tax burden on middle- and lower-income households. She has raised over $18,000 for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 32 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 32 includes part of King County and Snohomish County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Cindy Ryu

Incumbent Cindy Ryu was first elected to the Legislature in 2010. Before that, she served on the Shoreline City Council and has worked as an insurance agent and a small business owner. Last session, the Democrat sponsored legislation to curb catalytic converter theft and expand broadband access. Her sparse website doesn’t offer much in the way of priorities, but she has been endorsed by various mayors in the district, the Sierra Club, the Washington State Labor Council and the Snohomish County Democrats. The longtime senator has more than $97,000 for campaigning.

Lori Theis

Incumbent Cindy Ryu’s challenger in the 32nd District House race, Lori Theis, prefers the Election Integrity Party. Her candidate statement contains the similar, discredited message of many voter fraud conspiracy theorists that the state can’t verify that “voter rolls are clean; our ballot chain-of-custody is sound … our systems aren’t being misused….” Theis so far hasn’t raised any money for the race. 

State House of Representatives, District 32 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 32 includes part of King County and Snohomish County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Lauren Davis

Lauren Davis is facing her third election after first winning her 32nd District House seat in 2018. In her time in the Legislature, she has been an advocate for changes in the way the state treats mental and behavioral health. Before serving in the Legislature, Davis helped found Washington Recovery Alliance after supporting a friend recovering from an alcohol and opiate addiction. She served as the group’s executive director. Read Crosscut’s story here. Davis has won her past two elections easily. She has about $59,000 on hand for the election.

Anthony Hubbard

Republican Anthony Hubbard, who is incumbent Lauren Davis’ only opponent in the 32nd District, repeats the familiar claims of 2020 election fraud and that “your elected officials have an obligation to provide verifiable information so you can pursue and obtain that assurance,” according to his candidate statement. He has raised no money.

State Senate, District 33

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 33 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Karen Keiser

Karen Keiser and the other incumbents in the 33rd Legislative District aren’t facing any opponents this year. She has served as the district’s state senator since 2001, when she was appointed to the seat. Before that, she was a state representative. The former reporter also worked as a communications director of the Washington State Labor Council for two decades. A Democrat, she helped push through the state’s Paid Family and Medical Leave Law, which provides 12 weeks of paid leave. She has over $178,000 in the bank for the race.

Marliza Melzer

The Republican challenger for Senate in the 33rd Legislative District is Marliza Melzer, who served four years on the North Highline Unincorporated Area Council. She has worked in customer service in the grocery industry, as well as in health care and broadcasting. She says in her candidate statement that “current career politicians have no problems lying, destroying our economy, taxing us out of our homes and vehicles, supporting pro-crime policies, and policies that sexually groom our young children while at the same time labeling concerned parents as domestic terrorists.” According to the Public Disclosure Commission, Melzer has raised nearly $4,000 for her campaign. 

State House of Representatives, District 33 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 33 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Tina Orwall

Another long-time state representative, Tina Orwall has represented the 33rd Legislative District since 2009. Orwall, a Democrat, received a master’s of social work administration from the University of Washington and spent 20 years working in the mental health field. In recent legislative sessions, Orwall sponsored bills to establish a suicide prevention hotline to divert callers from police and legislation to require require rape kits be tested, tracked and stored. Read Crosscut’s coverage of the bills here and here. She has raised about $54,000 for the campaign, which has not drawn a challenger.

State House of Representatives, District 33 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 33 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Mia Su-Ling Gregerson

Mia Su-Ling Gregerson has represented the 33rd District since 2013. The former SeaTac City Council member has also worked as a business manager in the dental field. A Democrat, Gregerson has sponsored bills on  “Bridging the Digital Divide” to increase access to computers in schools. She also has supported loosening restrictions on accessory dwelling units, also known as ADUs, and backyard cottages. And she advocated providing legal assistance for low-income tenants facing eviction. She helped establish Washington's first Office of Equity. Gregerson, like her fellow 33rd Legislative District seatmates, lacks an opponent this election. She has about $86,000 in the bank for the race.

State Senate, District 34

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 34 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Joe Nguyen

Joe Nguyen was first elected to the 34th District Senate seat four years ago, becoming Washington’s first Vietnamese American state senator. His sparse election website doesn’t offer much insight into his priorities. In the candidate statement Nguyen submitted when filed to run for the seat, he cited endorsements from U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Planned Parenthood, Washington State Labor Council, Seattle Education Association and Alliance for Gun Responsibility. He has sponsored and supported bills aimed at curbing carbon emissions, increasing welfare benefits and imposing a tax on yearly incomes over $1 million. The technology consultant and nonprofit leader lost his bid last year to oust King County Executive Dow Constantine. He has raised about $222,000 for his reelection campaign.

John Potter

Republican John Potter is a paraeducator for the Highline School District. He lives in Burien and is also a landlord. According to his statement in the state voter guide, he embraces conservative values, including opposing abortion. He supports the entire Bill of Rights and says he thinks people should be able to say Merry Christmas “without fear of reprisal.” Potter does not have a campaign website. He has not raised any money for his campaign, according to the state Public Disclosure Commission.

State House of Representatives, District 34 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 34 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Emily Alvarado

One of two Democrats hoping to capture the seat left open after state Rep. Eileen Cody’s retirement is Emily Alvarado. She is the former director of Seattle’s Office of Housing, where she said she led efforts to build thousands of affordable homes, protect renters and expand homeownership. The political newcomer and West Seattle resident has racked up endorsements from a nonprofit housing alliance, various unions and the Washington State Labor Council, along with the Seattle Education Association. Alvarado has a law degree from the University of Washington. After working for the city of Seattle, she went on to be an executive at a national affordable housing nonprofit. Along with affordable housing, Alvarado says she would prioritize health care and education, if elected. She has about $144,000 in the bank for the race.

Leah Griffin

Leah Griffin is one of two Democrats vying for the position left open by the retirement of long-time state Rep. Eileen Cody. After Griffin was raped, she formed a group that pushed through legislation requiring rape kits be tested, tracked and stored, along with clearing the backlog of untested kits. Read Crosscut’s coverage here. Griffin, who serves as a committee chair of the National Women’s Political Caucus of Washington, wants to pass state legislation to increase access to abortion health care. Concerning housing affordability, another Griffin priority, she wants to shift from incentivizing private developers to building public developments. Endorsements come from groups supporting women’s rights, as well as local unions and Democratic groups. The certified school librarian has raised more than $118,000 for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 34 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 34 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Andrew Pilloud

Andrew Pilloud, the Republican candidate for Position 2 representing the 34th Legislative District, lives in the Arbor Heights neighborhood of West Seattle and says his goal is “to leave Seattle a better place for my daughter,” according to his campaign site. He wants to increase the state budget for mental health services, something he considers essential for ending homelessness. He's also concerned about crime and gun violence, and believes everyone should have a right to choose whether to be vaccinated or wear a mask. He has raised about $2,400 for his campaign.

Joe Fitzgibbon

Joe Fitzgibbon has held this position in the 34th Legislative District since 2010. He ran unopposed two years ago. Fitzgibbon is a former member of Futurewise, a group that advocates for policies to combat climate change and urban sprawl. He has helped pass legislation to establish a clean fuel standard and stronger state greenhouse gas reduction goals. Fitzgibbon has also supported legislation that aims to address the region’s housing shortage and has been a vocal advocate of expanding transit. He has raised about $184,000 for the race.

State Senate, District 36

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 36 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Noel Frame

Noel Frame has been in the Washington House since 2016 and is now eyeing the Senate seat representing the 36th District, with hopes of replacing long-time Sen. Reuven Carlyle, who is retiring. Before joining the state Legislature, she was director of a progresive organization that recruited and trained candidates to run for office. The Democrat co-chairs the bipartisan Tax Structure Work Group, which develops proposals to revamp Washington’s tax code. Frame has also played a major role in several juvenile justice reform bills and measures to improve the life of children in foster care. Frame has raised about $146,000 for the race.

Kate Martin

Kate Martin, a Democrat running for the Senate seat representing the 36th Legislative District, is a planning and design consultant focusing on accessory dwelling units and outdoor spaces, according to her campaign site. Martin has been a Democrat, Republican and an independent. She believes that both parties, in order to craft sensible solutions, need to move to the center. She has raised about $5,000 for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 36 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 36 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Jeff Manson

Jeff Manson, an administrative law judge, is a Democrat running for the open House seat in the 36th Legislative District. After law school, he represented low-income clients who were appealing cases in which state agencies were terminating the clients’ benefits. Mason has been endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council, 36th District Democrats, King County Democrats and Environment & Climate Caucus of the Washington State Democrats, along with several local unions. If elected, he says that to increase the building of housing he will support “smart density legislation” that prioritizes the construction of residential, business and leisure space within walking distance of public transport. He has raised more than $98,000 for the race. The PDC reports another $22,000 has been spent by others to promote his campaign.

Julia G. Reed

A newcomer running for the House in the 36th Legislative District is Julia Reed. The former 36th District Democratic chair is a consultant for businesses and nonprofits on expanding workplace diversity. She supports allowing duplexes, triplexes and backyard cottages in areas traditionally reserved for single-family homes. And she wants to increase funding for electrifying buses and ferries, while also expanding the network of electric car charging stations and subsidizing the purchase of electric bicycles. Reed also backs revamping Washington’s regressive tax structure. She has been endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council and the Washington chapter of the National Women’s Political Caucus, plus a few local unions. She has raised about $191,000 for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 36 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 36 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Liz Berry

Running for reelection for her second term this fall, Liz Berry is unopposed. During her first legislative session, Berry sponsored and supported bills to strengthen gun control laws, build affordable housing quickly and establish a guaranteed basic income for low-income residents. The Democrat supports increasing funding for electrifying ferries and building bike and pedestrian infrastructure. The one-time legislative aide to former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords of Arizona has also served on the board of Pro-Choice Washington and is a self-described lifelong reproductive justice advocate. Berry has about $124,000 in the bank for her campaign.

State Senate, District 37

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 37 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Rebecca Saldaña

Running unopposed for senator in the 37th Legislative District is Rebecca Saldaña. The Democrat was appointed to the seat in 2016, when U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal decided to run for Congress. Saldaña was challenged but held the seat a year later and later won reelection with nearly 90% of the vote. As vice chair of the state Senate Transportation Committee, she pushed to expand funding for nonmotorized transportation and public transportation, ensuring the recent transportation package paid for more than just highways and roads. Saldaña was executive director of Puget Sound Sage, an advocacy organization for workers and immigrants. Her campaign has raised about $175,000 for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 37 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 37 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Sharon Tomiko Santos

Since taking office in 1999, Sharon Tomiko Santos has cruised to victory in reelection campaigns. The former banker and nonprofit manager is a founding member of the Washington Tax Fairness Coalition, advocating for a more progressive tax structure to pay for schools. Santos is the longest-serving legislator of color in Washington state history. She chairs the House Education Committee and has been endorsed by the Seattle Education Association and the Washington State Labor Council, along with various local unions and Democratic groups. The longtime representative has about $72,000 on hand for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 37 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 37 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Emijah Smith

Emijah Smith is running for the 37th District House seat left open when Rep. Kirsten Harris-Talley decided not to run for reelection. Smith’s platform includes more funding for schools, mental health care and affordable child care, according to her campaign site. Smith has spent years advocating for public education, health care access and housing for working families in South Seattle. She has served on committees to steer new policies in those areas. The former medical assistant at the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic has also served as PTSA president for Mercer Middle School. Smith raked in endorsements from King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay and Seattle City Councilmember Tammy Morales. She has raised more than $114,000 for her race.

Chipalo Street

Chipalo Street, who works at Microsoft as a chief technology officer advising on emerging technologies, is competing for the 37th District House seat left open when Rep. Kirsten Harris-Talley said she wasn’t running for reelection. He co-founded an organization to connect volunteers with technology and computer science experience with Black and brown students in South Seattle, according to his campaign site. The site also lists as priorities expanding access to quality early education and providing two years of college. He also wants to do away with single-family zoning near transit-rich areas to increase the building of missing middle housing, which can range from duplexes and backyard cottages to small apartment buildings. Endorsements come from port commissioners and a few former and current state representatives. So far, Street has raised about $133,000 for the race.

State Senate, District 42

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 42 includes part of Whatcom County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Simon Sefzik

Current state Sen. Simon Sefzik took office earlier this year, appointed to the position after the sitting senator, Doug Ericksen, died of COVID-19. The Republican, 22, is Washington's youngest-ever senator on record. During this past session, Sefzik supported bills that would temporarily suspend the gas tax and improve health care for low-income kids. If elected, he says he would advocate for legislation that reverses “extreme anti-police legislation and gives our law enforcement the resources and training they need to keep our communities safe.” His endorsements include the Washington Council of Police and Sheriffs, Whatcom County Republican Party and Young Republicans. He has raised over $692,000, but there have also been a lot of independent expenditures in this race.

Sharon Shewmake

The Democratic challenger for the 42nd Legislative District Senate seat, Sharon Shewmake, is one of the district’s current state representatives. She has served one term in that chamber and now is looking to take the Senate seat. Shewmake is an economics professor at Western Washington University and a children’s book author. She lists as accomplishments passing COVID-19 relief for people experiencing homelessness, as well as housing assistance and the working families tax credit. Affordable housing and child care, along with access to clean and renewable solar, are among her priorities. Shewmake’s endorsements include the Washington State Labor Council, Washington State Education Association and a handful of health care, building, labor and trade unions and Democratic groups. She has raised over $509,000, but there have also been a large amount of independent expenditures in this race.

State House of Representatives, District 42 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 42 includes part of Whatcom County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Alicia Rule

Position 1 is the only House seat in the 42nd Legislative District with an incumbent running. Alicia Rule, a Democrat who is serving her first term, hopes to keep her seat this fall. She owns a small therapy practice and before being elected to the statehouse, she sat on the Blaine City Council. “Dramatically increasing shelter to get people off the streets is a top priority,” she writes on her campaign website, “We must no longer allow so many Washingtonians to be homeless.” She is endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council, Pro-Choice Washington and health care, education, building and trade unions and Democratic groups. Rule has raised more than $408,000  but there also have been a lot of independent expenditures for this race.

Tawsha (Dykstra) Thompson

Tawsha Dykstra Thompson is a Republican challenging incumbent Rep. Alicia Rule for the 42nd Legislative District House seat. Thompson spent nearly 25 years in the Bellingham Police Department as an officer, detective and sergeant, according to her candidate statement. She lists disaster case manager as her current position. If elected, she said she would “fully support our police and first responders” and will be a “voice for those who have been canceled and intimidated and ignored. The silent majority deserves to be heard.” Her endorsements include WACOPS and a handful of local officials. Thompson has raised roughly $254,000 for this election but there have also been a lot of independent expenditures in the race.

State House of Representatives, District 42 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 42 includes part of Whatcom County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Joe Timmons

Running as a Democrat for the 42nd Legislative District Position 2 seat in the House is Joe Timmons, who is a liaison for Gov. Jay Inslee’s office stationed in northwest Washington. Addressing climate change is a top priority for Timmons, and he wants to do that by decarbonizing our transportation sector and increasing energy efficiency, according to his campaign website. Timmons also believes in the need to “invest in mental health and support police so they can do their jobs, while having common-sense reforms to stop abuses of power.” Timmons racked up endorsements from several tribal groups, the Washington State Labor Council, Alliance for Gun Responsibility and local unions and Democratic groups. He has raised about $313,000 for the race.

Dan Johnson

Dan Johnson, who is running as a Republican for the 42nd Legislative District Position 2 in the House, spent four years in the Marine Corps. He then ran a towing and recovery business for over two decades. Johnson hosts the online video cast The Hook News and Information, which focuses on politics and current events. His campaign website is light on his priorities. In his candidate statement he wrote that “police reform has contributed to a statewide crime wave.” With the late Sen. Doug Ericksen, Johnson co-wrote a DUI bill titled Hailey’s Law. If elected, he said he would use his business and military background to bring private sector solutions to government problems. The small business owner has raised about $190,000 for his campaign.

State Senate, District 43

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 43 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Jamie Pedersen

Jamie Pedersen, like the other incumbents in the 43rd Legislative District, faces no opponents this year. He has served in the Senate since 2013. Before that, he was a state representative in the district. Pedersen, a lawyer, is employed by McKinstry, a Seattle-based construction and engineering firm. He supports the capital gain tax and hopes the passage of it leads to a state income tax. In the past few sessions, Pedersen has supported bills to reform the criminal justice system, including limits on police tactics from chokeholds to use of tear gas. He also has supported measures to reduce carbon emissions and strengthen gun laws. The longtime senator has over $152,000 on hand for the uncontested race.

State House of Representatives, District 43 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 43 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Nicole Macri

Nicole Macri first took office in 2017 and easily won two reelections since. In the week leading up to ballots being sent to voters, Macri’s campaign website was still in its final edits. She has no opponents in this race. Macri has pushed for ending the state’s ban on rent control and for strengthening tenant protections. She has been a strong progressive voice for issues surrounding affordable housing, homelessness and behavioral health. Macri is the deputy director of the Downtown Emergency Service Center, which promotes a housing first model and has been a strong advocate for increasing spending on homeless services and affordable housing. Marci has more than $91,000 in the bank for her campaign.

State House of Representatives, District 43 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 43 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Frank Chopp

Frank Chopp first took office in the statehouse in 1995. He served as speaker of the House for two decades, stepping down in 2019. He is running unopposed this election. Like his seatmate, Nicole Macri, Chopp has sponsored bills that increased funding for homeless services and expanded paid leave. He also supports expanding tenant rights and rental assistance, as well as providing free college tuition to those families who cannot afford a higher education. He has raised about $20,000 for the race.

State Senate, District 46

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 46 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Matthew Gross

Matthew Gross, a King County deputy prosecuting attorney, is running as a Democrat in the 46th Legislative District Senate race to replace Sen. David Frockt, who is retiring from the Legislature. “As a prosecutor, I believe strongly in individual accountability but cracking down on low-level crime is not the best way to make us safer,” he wrote in his campaign statement. He wants to increase funding for mental health care and drug treatment. He also wants to slightly increase density in single-family neighborhoods, while upping yearly spending on building and acquiring new units of affordable housing. Gross lists no endorsements on his campaign page. He’s raised about $26,000 for his campaign.

Javier Valdez

Javier Valdez, a state representative since 2017, is one of two Democrats vying for the seat being vacated by Sen. David Frockt, who is retiring after more than a decade in the Legislature. If elected, Valdez says his priorities include banning assault weapons and protecting access to reproductive health care, according to his campaign site. As a state representative, he has helped pass bills to strengthen gun laws and the state’s hate crime statute. He has worked to advise the city of Seattle on equity and inclusion. Endorsements come from the Washington State Labor Council, King County Democrats, Washington Education Association and scores of local union and Democrat groups. Valdez has raised more than $200,000 for this race.

State House of Representatives, District 46 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 46 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Gerry Pollet

Gerry Pollet is running for his sixth election for the state House in the 46th Legislative District. The environmental activist and lawyer has advocated for the Hanford Nuclear Reservation cleanup. Pollet teaches at the University of Washington School of Public Health. He believes quality health care is a fundamental human right and supports Medicare for All. Pollet has collected endorsements from U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, the Washington and Seattle teachers unions, the Washington State Labor Council, and numerous local trade and union groups. During the last legislative session, he helped pass legislation addressing lead in drinking water in schools. The bill, which required schools to test water, became a national model. Pollet has more than $60,000 in the bank for the race.

State House of Representatives, District 46 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 46 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Darya Farivar

Running for a House seat in the 46th Legislative District is Darya Farivar, the public policy director of Disability Rights Washington. At the advocacy organization, she focused on the Trueblood case, in which a federal judge found the state violated people’s rights by taking too long to determine competency to stand trial, leaving them languishing in county jails. She says her oversight of behavioral health programs gives her the experience to craft policies. She has gathered endorsements from King County Young Democrats, University of Washington Young Democrats and the Transit Riders Union, as well as many local elected officials and community leaders. She has about $153,000 for the election.

Lelach Rave

Javier Valdez’s open seat has attracted all Democrats to the race, including Lelach Rave, a pediatrician, mom and pragmatic progressive says she will balance policies “that protect what we love about our neighborhoods, while at the same time making sure we don’t exclude people…,” according to her campaign site. During her time as a committee chair with the Washington chapter of the American Association of Pediatrics she urged the adoption of a range of policies, including banning toxic flame retardants and raising the legal age to purchase tobacco from 18 to 21. Endorsements include a list of local doctors and few local elected officials. Rave has raised more than $296,000 for the race.

State Senate, District 47

Washington has 49 legislative districts, each of which elects one Senator. District 47 includes part of King County. Not sure which district you live in? Find out here.

Bill Boyce

The president of the Kent City Council, Bill Boyce, is also a human resources leader at Boeing. 

He served for 16 years on Kent School Board before joining the city council. Boyce, a Republican, is concerned about people being priced out of their homes, a rising crime rate, and people not feeling safe in their communities. He says the police need to be supported and given the tools they need to do their jobs, but also held to high standards. Boyce also wants to lower taxes and repeal Washington’s long-term care insurance program. According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Boyce has raised about $400,000 for this race.

Claudia Kauffman

Democrat Claudia Kauffman previously served as state Senator for the 47th Legislative District from 2007 to 2011. She is the intergovernmental affairs liaison for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, as well as co-founder of the Native Action Network. Kauffman was previously chair of the Green River College Board of Trustees. She is concerned about issues including affordable housing, rising crime rates, homelessness and children struggling with mental and behavioral health issues after living through the pandemic. She wants to see lower property taxes for seniors and those on fixed incomes and more money for public schools. Kauffman is endorsed by U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer and other public figures. According to the state Public Disclosure Commission, Kauffman has raised about $278,000 for this race.

State House of Representatives, District 47 Pos. 1

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 47 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.

Debra Jean Entenman

Debra Jean Entenman has been a state representative for the 47th Legislative District since 2018. She is vice chair of the College & Workforce Development Committee, and a member of the Transportation Committee and the Civil Rights and Judiciary Committee. She grew up in south Seattle and has worked in U.S. Rep. Adam Smith’s office for 12 years. The Democrat is a member of the Renton Technical College Board of Trustees. During her time in the Legislature, Entenman has focused on bills that strengthen social safety nets, address public safety, protect elders, support workers and invest in training for frontline responders. Entenman says her future work will focus on economic recovery for both businesses and people. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, she had $69,000 in the bank for this election.

Kyle Lyebyedyev

The Republican challenger to be a state representative for the 47th Legislative District, Kyle Lyebyedyev, is a small business owner who is helping build homes around Puget Sound. He has no elected experience but volunteers to host Ukrainian refugees and at the Northwest Ukrainian Festival. Lyebyedyev immigrated from Ukraine in 2002, while it was still under Communist control, to seek freedom and happiness. He believes state politicians in Olympia have failed and he wants to work toward improving education, decreasing taxes, improving public safety and helping small business owners create more family-wage jobs. According to the Public Disclosure Commission, he had about $80,000 in the bank for this election.

State House of Representatives, District 47 Pos. 2

The WA State House is made up of 98 representatives, two from each legislative district. There are separate races for each of the two seats. District 47 includes part of King County. Not sure what district you live in? Find out here.